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环亚2020年05月27日19时59分02秒

时间:2020-05-29 04:42:01 作者:百度云 浏览量:93967

复制网址领彩金【ag88.shop】5OkA zgxfO2rJAnimal conserva【tion "a gove】rnment priority" says U】nited Arab EmiratesCBP8

U9qvAn international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gsizmr

wT8oOne of Greece&rsquo\;s 】【most】 popular tourist d\esti/n\atio/】ns is at risk of ecological and economical disaster as drilling【 companie\s pr\epar】e 】to exploit /thou【sands of kilometres of】 \la/nd, the World Wide Fund for N\atu\re【 (WWF) has】 w】arned.The Gre/ek government has allocated/\ 17/,000 square kilometr【es of Zakynthos to o】il/ c\【ompanies, leadi【ng to activi//sts to 【warn of t【he potential effects drilling fo【r o/il and gas could have.&l/dquo;A】bou】】t a third 【of \】the GDP of the Ionian islands comes from tourism. S】o,【 im/ag【ine t/he scenario【 【of a/ minor】】 or greater【 oil accident and what d【oes that】 mean f【or these is】l/ands】,&rdquo】; said De】】mitres】 Karavellas, t/he\ /direc/\tor-gener/al of WWF Greece.To 【hel】p 【raise awa\reness of the issue, the【 WWF France /sailing boat ‘Bl】ue Panda’ is tra/\vel】ling【/ the Ionian Sea, informing 【islanders at destinations such as Zante, Itha\/ca and K/【e\falonia about the problem.WWF is particularly concerned about the protecti/【on/ of \the loggerhe】ad turtl【e.S/hare this articleCopy/paste the article video embe】\d link below:CopyShar/eTwe【e\tSharesend/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSen\dShareS】hareShareSe/ndSh/areShareYou mi/g/ht also like/ \ / Europe \acc【used of 'turning a b【li\nd eye' to risk /of corona【virus in migrant camps / 】 Greece use【s】 state TV to\【 teach sc】hool children during coronavi】rus loc/kdown \ \ \ / 【 / Migrants arriving in Greece 】say the】y have no pr\otection again\st coronavirus \ 【 Mo【re aboutGreeceEcologica【l【【 cris/is//WWFEnviron/men【tal prote【ctionNa【tur【al\ 】gasOil 【market Brow\se to/day/'】s tagsF7xlw8MM

FjR3Gra/pe skin leather\ is one of the】/ alternativ/es. \Bjmo

KcMFText sizeAaAaThe d/ebate arou\nd the sustainability of le\a【ther p\rodu】ction is g【ai/ning m【omentum in th【】e fashion/【 industry. In 】recent y【ears, ra/ising awareness around the\ ecological impact o】f producin/g le】athe】r i/tems】 has prompt\ed a gro【w】】ing number of brands to rec\onside】r their u【se of the fa【bri】c in】 th】e/ir fashio【n lines/, as well as it has【 pushe/d new actors to \co】me up w\ith innovative solutions to creat\e more ecol【og\ically-【fr/】iendly le\ather/.The ec】ologica【l cost of leather productio】nT/he initial r】aw\ material for l\eather 【producti】/on is animal【 skin\ which orig【inates from ani】mal farming, a pro】ce\ss w\h【ich】 【usually rel】ie【s on huge amounts of feed, pasturel/and【, water, and】 fossil fuels with ne/gative ecologic\al impacts. However, leathe【r /is 】on】l】y a by-pro/duct in thi】s process, the animals being primarily raised for their me\【at/.Where/ the e【nvir【onmental cos/t of leat】her product\io\n really beco】mes visibl【e is at the /stage of the\ transformatio【n of the animal skin into the f】inal prod/uct. Since /leather is a perishable material, a number 】of methods have been used to st【abi【//lise t\【he raw mate【ri\al, and make it m\ore durable via t/h【e tanning process.This 】】is an indus【trial process that【 typically involves 【many ch\e】mical com】pounds and uses up a lot of water and energy. A number of hazardous mat\eri/】als a\nd /p】ollutants are/ releas\ed i】n 】the envir【onmen【t s\uch 【as mineral salts, lime slud】ge, sulfides, fo\rmaldeh\yd\e, coal-tar de/ri【vatives, a】nd various oil【s, dyes, and finishes (some o/f them cyani【de-bas【ed) are employed. . Water \i】s u【sed in】 high quantit】【y as a s/olvent, which is all the more problematic that a significa【nt n【umbe\r of tan【neries/ are lo【cate】\d in ar\id regions \of the world.To a】ddress these i【ssues, \the dev\elopment of new technologies t【o\ 】provide】 more ef【fici\ent processes for【 the pr\oduction of le】ather【 is under】way. So are efforts to promote the production of synth】etic leath\e\r, /w/hi】c/h could offer an interes【ting【】 alternative to th【e fas/hi【on indu【stry.Cow lea】\ther vs synthetic leatherFor 】change 】to happe】n in the leather i/ndustry tho】ugh, rob/ust assessme/nts of t\he/ dif/feren】t m】ethods us\ed in the ta【nn】ing process/ and compari\sons betw【ee\n cow lea】ther an\d other materi】als, are ne【ed\ed.Researchers have assessed the e【cological impact of different ta【nning methods to se【e if on【e was prefe】rable in t【】erms of its environment/al footprint.】 One o】f the techniques 【that some tanneries \employ to reduce the u【se\ of harmful che】micals is to 】resort to vege/table-tann【i【ng.This is an artisanal process that tak/【es advantage of /the t】an【ni\c acids na【】turally found i/】【】n some pl\】ants, by using the/ barks, branches,】 lea【ves or even s】\ome fruits in s/ome specific te\chniques. 【It is /【t\houg【ht to be more 【environmental/ly friendly than oth/e/r methods of processing /cow l\eather.To find out more,/ a 2017 stu【dy comp【a\r/ed this 【m【eth/o/d to more t\radit\ional 【methods using chemi】\cals suc\h a【\【s c/hromium-】/tanning, looking at th\e carbon, water, and energy 【footprint o\f the vege】\table】 】and chromium leather pro】ces/sing 】technology in 12 selecte/d tanneries in seven dif/ferent coun】/tries worldwide.The scientists act【【u】a【lly fo【und no sign/if【ican】t d\iff【erences in the fo【otpr【int of vegetabl/】e 】and chromium leather processes. Ho【wever, they cauti】on that this type of research is /challenging to do and /that tak/i】ng steps to improve the leather ind/ustry need to be base\d\ on evidence\-based resea\r【ch.“\Each tannery proved to be 【very individual, a\nd the\refore 】att【empting to pe/rform this type of analysis /without si【mply producin/g【 meaningle【ss generalities is 【a cha\llenge\ f【or companies, researcher\s, and regulator/s,&r】dquo; the 】researchers say. While【 /there is/\ little evide\nce \then that cho】osing a spec\ific m【ethod of leather tanning may be 【bette\r fo【】r the environment, \the evidence in favour of producing syntheti\c lea\ther ins】tead of leat】【her from /an\imals i\s mounting.Th】e 201】【 Pulse of T【he 】Fash/ion Industry Report published by the Global】 Fashion Agenda and The Bos/ton Con/\s】ult【ing Grou/p, was instrumental in highlig【ht【ing the\ idea that the prod】uctio/n/ of 】synthetic leather i\s less d】amaging /to the \environment/. It offer/ed 【some \of th【e most robus【t 】conclusions 【o】n th/e subject to date,】 p【ro】mpting\ 【stake】holders in the】 fashion indus/t\ry to switch to more ecological options, including synthetic leat【he】r【.Th】e /rep】o【rt indee\d/ showed \that among /all the materia】ls used in the fashion \ind】ustry, an】imal leather ranked thi【rd as the main contributor to global\/ warmi\ng. I【t also came first as the 【most damaging mat【erial/ when resea\rchers looked 【at th\】e issue of eutrophicat【】ion : its man【ufa】ctu【re was【 associated w】ith a relea/se of excessive chemical compounds and nu/trients/ into bodi【es of w】ater, frequently due to runoff from】 th【e land, causing\ dense growth of plant l\if【e\ and deat\/h /of 】anima【l\ life from lack of 【oxygen.More impor】tantl【y, the report found that synthetic leather /had on average on】ly /【a third of the environme】n】tal \impact of【【 cow leather. 】Switching to/ alternative materi】\【/a\/ls, including synthetic leather【, could thus directl\y improve a p\roduct&rs【quo;s 】ecological foot/prin】t.Gro】wing number of initiativesThe \mes【s【age【 has progressively\ been recei\ved\ and a growing numbe\r of initiatives i/llustrat】e the mo/ve to abandon cow l】eath】er for its synt】hetic a【lternatives. Exa\mples of a\dva/nces rely o【n the development a】nd the us【e of non/-convent/iona/【l fib/e\rs made fr【om substances /su【ch as c/itrus/ juice, grape 】plan/ts, or kelp, bioengin/eered \/leather, and the furt】her【 /promotion of bast f【ibers.In its m】】o/st re\ce/nt 2018 edition, the Pulse of Th【e Fashion In/dustry Report presen【te\d a num\ber of projects carri/ed by companies dedicated to su\stainable fashion and t【o pro/ducing synthetic【 le【at【her at the lowest ecological c/ost.Mi\lan-based compa【ny Vegea \is fo\r in【stance working to crea【te leather that is 】m/a【de entirely fr【o【m【】 grapes skin, stalks, an\d seeds and for th/is, it【 won th【e 20】17 H&M Global Change Award. Another good e\xa【【mple is the company known 【a】s 【Provenance Biofabrics which pr】oduces b】ioengineere【d leather【 by pr】ogramming /collagen molec】ules to self-assem\ble.These are 】just some of the initiative【s/ under d\eve【lopment, \and the f/i】eld is now undergoing a period of inno】】va【】tion and dynamism】. /Exactly】 what 2019 will bring is 【uncle【ar】, \b【ut one thing is cer【tain\ : the leather industry 【is/\ profoundly changing to b/ecome more sustainable.Writer: L\éa Su【rugueShare th】is article 【 】 More from styleCcaK

2mcPAt the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tagsgBdM

How to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eater

i1Y4Wi\th/ the Europ\ean Union’s】 focus on the climate action and the EU\ G【reen D\eal, Commissioner \for Envir【on】ment, Oceans【 and F【is/h/e【ries \Virginijus Sinke/vič/;ius is la【unching a /new/ 【Global Coalition for Bi【odiversit【y\ at Wor【ld Wild Life Day in】\【 Monaco.The youngest Com】missio】ner at the Eu\ropean Union, Lith】uanian S【inkevi&【#2/69;ius was a member of \Lithuania【n【 Parliament and Minister of the /Ec【/onomy and In\】no【va/tion o【f the Republic of Lithuania be【fo】re t【aking the p】ost a】t t】he E【uro】pean Commission.【Now charged with finding European solu\tions to the worsening /c】limate and ecological crisis, he spoke to Euronews' busine】ss edito【r,\ Sas】ha Vakulina about what is re】qu\ired to turn climate change and bio【d】【】ivers【ity\ loss around.Tell us【【\ a b【it more a】bout th【e Global Coalition for /Biodiversity and 】what is its role\ wh【en/ it comes to the bigger E\U e/n/】vironment】】al agenda?\I think we hav】e a\chieved\ terrific succes\s 【in rec【【e【nt years launching/ similar campai/gns on marin\e litte\r, on plast\【ic pollution in our oceans. Now ha】vin】g【 \thi/s year/ 】being devote【d to biodiversity, it is time to\ raise awareness about /biodiversity loss. The science is very 】】clear:/ 【out of 8 million as/】sesse\d – /1 mi\llion are at risk of extinction. We ha\ve to halt biod/】iversity loss caused /by 【the human activ】ities. \The b】e【st tool to /do so is a societ/y which is mobilized, which supp【orts certai【n decisions, which leads us to me\et/ing ho【pefully in Oc/tober/ in China【 /to 【r】each a global 【agr//e/ement equal t】o t\he P】aris \Accord reached in 201】6.And latest Euro-bar】ometer 【shows us 94% o【f Europeans care about environment【 /\p【r/otectio】n\ – 【it is a clear signal for politicians to【 act. A】nd I am tru【l\y p/roud that the】 European Commissio\n did so from t\he very \first days, introducing our flagship initiative &ndash\】; the Eur】opean Gr/een Deal.With the bi/g social movement over the past year, i/ncluding Frida\ys fo】r Fu】\tur【e, there has been a big focus on/ the climate /and /ecological crisis. Should【 focu/s shift to/wards【 biodi\/vers【【ity?【To\ b\e honest we don\&rsq【uo;t need \to c】\h\ange t\he】 focus. Climate change is \important and significa】nt 【to be a/ware of. And I a【m 【truly happ【y th】at we\ finally reached the】 point that w//hen you ask people in t/he \st/reet, they w\ill explai】n climate change to you. I think we have to do the same great work raising awareness about \biod】iver/s\ity. Because\ if y】ou lo/ok at the solution for stopping climate change/ and/ glob/al warming, on/\e third/ of it i/s in having a healthy ecosystem of biodiv【/ersity【 &n】d\ash; healt/【hy 【oceans\, seas, la】nd】】【, forest - everythin/g around\ us is/ biodiversity】】. 】And, of course, th】ose 】specie\s whi【c【h not o【nly 【keep o【ur nature alive, but also put food on our】 table【】s.The Eu】ropean Union has clearly put 【the Green D】e】al on】\ top on its age\nda. What is the 'blue' element \of the bigger Green\ 】Deal Pict】ur/e?That is 】correct. P【art of my\ work is to make the Green deal blue. By【 protectin】g biodiversit【y we canno【t speak only about protecting sp\ecies or\ protectio/\n of l/and, soil or fores】t. We【 also have to address oceans. That is \why this year it is/ going t】o 【be c【rucially important /】\to als】o reach a global agreement on \/protection of the high seas】,\ which today, \is not being ful/ly implemented.EU budget talks o【r M\ult】ia\nnual /Fin/a//ncial Framework (MFF) \talks are on/ /amid pr】essu【re for more climate action. What are 】your expectations a/nd what 】are your priori\ties th\】a【t/ y\ou want to see fr】om the MFF?】F【irst o\f all, pro【bably, the Commissi【on would like to see agreement. We /can/no【t a//fford delay and that would be, pro】bably, /th\e worst outcome.S】econdly,】 】o】f course, if /we \are to seriou\sly step \u\p effort on biodive】rsity protectio】n, on t/he Green Deal, it has【 to be su】fficien】tly funded. I a】m glad to see that that call\ has 【been heard【, bu\t most imp】ortant】】 is th\e part on subsidies. S【ubsi【【die】s, payme/nts\, which \go directl【y from/ the EU budget, fro\m different en/velope/s – they 】also have to /be in\】 line 】with the 】Gree/n Deal and the/y can】not enhance】 biodiversity loss or stimulate climate change.W\e have \to be sure that/ certain activ/i\ties do/\n’t cause environmenta\l loss, because it \would be ve\/ry strange if on the\ one han/d we increase【 】funding for b】iodiversity pro/t】ection, but on the other hand we fund certa【in \a】ctivities /that cause biodiversity lo【ss【.Y【ou’/ve touc\hed upon challenges and the i/mporta】【nt thi】n【\gs t/o do this year, what a【bout th\e Brexit s】】itu\ation when i】t comes to fisheries/【?Ne】go【tiations \just started and w\e are ready to t】alk. And I think if we are going to】 have a d\ialog【 where we/ are ready to mee/t each other, we a【re\ going 】to h】ave\ /a result tha】t is satisfying to all. The most imp【or【tant rea/lly 】i【s to com/e】 with \willingne\ss to find an /agreement.The /Fisheries agreement is th【e only one th【at's time bo\und, /it is a 【very short time. Let/’/s begin.\【 We a\re ready,\ I know the B\ritish /side as well. We 】will work tirelessly to find the best agreement/.【As a\【 former Mi/nister for the Economy and\ 【Innovation \in Lithuania, how does t/his 】experien/ce influence your job now as EU Co/mmissioner for Environment, Oceans and /Fisheries?On】e of t\he\ key \initia/tives tha/t we a\re g】oi/ng 【to a】/nnounce on the 11 March is t\he 】Cir【cular\ 【Economy A】\c\ti\on pl\an. It has various elements fro】m product policy to business 】and small/】 and medium enter】prise/ (SME) in【volvement. Beca/use if we are successful 【in imple\menting a \c/ircular econ\omy and 】changing\ current economic activities, if we to manage decoup\le grow【th from extract】i/on of resources, we can be very s【ucces\sful at halting biodivers】it】y loss. Bec【ause biodiversity loss is mainly【 due to extractio\n of resources which put enor/mous pr\essure on o】ur envi【】r【onment.T】h/ere is this aspect of transitio/【n 】a【s well when it comes 【to these\ new】 polic/ie【s. 【What is your\ take/ on that\?It i\s v/】ery \im\portant and \from the very b【eginning the【 Commi/ssion was vocal t\hat n\obod/y can be left \behin/【d.】 It i\s imp【ort】ant to mention that G】r】ee】n 【Deal i【s a g】rowth st】rategy 【and 】growth m\eans not t【o hold the amb】ition, but also help those, who are still not the】re. \An】d I think】 】the Green Deal can only be successful by/ having eve/ryone on board.An\d the final question, /you are the youngest commis【【sioner. How/ does th】】at influence your \polici\es?I a【m【 very open to communicate with everyone, wi\】th 】every Europ\ean citiz【en】 w/ho cares. 【And I think my role is to \/【raise awar/eness and 】to d\eliver./Share this articleCopy/】p】aste the article video embed link below/:Copy】ShareTwe】etSharesendShareTweet\/SharesendM\/ore\】HideShar【eSendSh【areShareShareSendShareShar】eYou 【【might also like 】 \ "No single co\untry w】ill be left behind in t】his crisi【】s&q\uot; says【 EU Commissioner for Internal Market / 【 【 / / \【 】 Fiscal support to non-Eurozone countr】ies a p】ossibil\ity as 】bloc backs\ ma【ssive coronavir【us 】rescue plan 】 【 / \ \ \【 Cor/on【avirus: an unpr】ecede/nted c】hallenge to de\mocracy? / 【 More aboutEnvi】ronmental prot】ec】tionE【U Com\missionE\uropean 】politicsMon\aco 【 Browse today's tagsaKqF

Tij5How to make your start-up busi/ness sus\tainable from day oneswJc

y6IaLife under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tags8JLa

VNQcFive new ways to help the env【ironmentzTP7

vNcv“The lo\nge/r the sup】ply 】chain, the m/ore 【is【 wasted/”7tb1

1kXJThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tags7HMV

n5WLHow to have a fl\ying free holida\y and】 【reconnect wi/th natur】eoIMk

5DmVMEPs ba/ck initiati\ve to reduce p/lastic waste a\n\d improve water quality7b2S

P5owHow to have a fl\ying free holida\y and】 【reconnect wi/th natur】eOqNp

1KZYYou’ve heard of offs\ett\ing, but】 what in the w【orld is carbon ins/etting?2MUF

rQ16What can your smartphone do for nature?8oGe

RTZyTe】xt s/izeAaAaWith a vie【【w to r\】ai\se awareness of the damaging i】mpact of carbon emissions produced from fly【ing, the UK are planning to introduce a tax to of【fset【 emissions. This &lsqu/o;carbo【n\ charge’ added to flight/ ticket pr【/\ices would/ fund eco-f/riend】ly pro/jects, like p】lanting\ t】rees to red/uce【 CO2 levels in o【ur/ a【tmosphe/re./ T】his sche】me would hopefully /encourage air passengers【 t】o fly le】\s/s】 frequently and to be aware o\f the ef/fect/ of t】ransport emis】】sions/ on th/e planet. But, do we ne/ed to【 f/ly【 to /a new destination to have an enric/hing summer holiday? \Can we have a real brea】k【 f【rom daily 【/life and n/ot \fly to a faraway de\stination? We【 /believe\ you abso/lutely】【 can and the】 /holi【day of d//r【e/ams you're lo\oking for, ma】y 【just be waiting for you in t/he countryside.The menta/l h】\ealth charity Mind state tha】t, &l】【/dq\u】o;spending ti【me in green spaces or bringing nature into your everyday life can】 benefit both your menta【l and 】/physical we/ll【being&rdquo/;, /so how can/ you have flying free ho【liday that prov\id】es you with all the benefits of being a\ro/und natur】e in the countrysi\de?Tran\sp/ortWhat are the no-fly alternatives?You/ may just gain a lot from the increasingly/ popular conce】pt of slow 【travel an】d f/eel a sense of joy as you 【me/ande】r through sites /【of natura\l beauty】 t【o y【our 【destin【ation.You could always 】sail the seas \on a ferry t】o\ ne】arby 【countries like Fran】ce, Irel】and a\nd \】Holl\and if the idea of a staycation doesn&rs\quo;t float your boat... To get \/to those tra】nqui【l\ spots\ where you can immerse yourself in nature【 why 】not\ rent a【/ \camper va\n wit】h Yescapa if 【you&【rsquo;re not a car owner. Cr\uising on a v\a【n trip would not on/l\y a】llow you t\o take all your home/ comforts w】ith you】/, but it \would a【lso give you 【the freedom to travel far a【n\d wide, without the 】need to fly of course【.A【 cam\per【 vanThe famous Inter/rail Pas】s gives y】ou th】e liberty to tra\vel to 31 differ/ent European countrie/s/, all of which a/re\ home to na\tural beaut/y. What to do onc/e y\ou arrive at the station【? Tra【velling from the s】tation to yo【ur countryside \de/stination could be arrange】d 【usin【g the car 】s【haring App BlaBla Car whic\h has been tried and tested. You 【might make some frien\ds and you won't h\ave the probl】em o\f park/ing the car. Any\ 】of t】hese/ options/ wi】ll hel/p to calm any eco-anx】iety that /you may be feeling. W】hat to【 d\oReconnect with natureA study has proven that any form of immersion in the natural world heighte】ns you\r overal/l we\ll-being and s/timulates you to have a more po/s【i】tive inter\ac】tion】/ with the /w【ider human com】/mun/i】ty. In【 light of th【i】s, many are p】ra\isin】g/ th\e Japanes/e p【ractice of \Fore】st Bathin】g. No,/ \this does not me/an taking a bath in 【between the trees. T/his ancient/ proces【s of relaxation involves】 qu】ietly】/ o\bserving nature, pl】acing yo\urself 【in proximity【 with the\ tr\ee\s/ and breathing deeply. I/f y/ou’re\ looking fo/r a range\ of forests in the UK c】ountryside, F【ore/stry E【ngland provides a searc【h engin\e so y】ou can fi\n/d t【he woods clo【s\e to\ you.A woodlandReconnecting wit【h natur】e can also be done th【rough/ a\ctivit/ies \like ou/tdoor yoga/, walking, wild sw/imming, cycling, wild 【swimming, I could go on.W\hat t\o takeRent a fa】ncy bell te】ntNot staying in】 a cotta】g/e 【or eco-lodg/e? Put/ti【ng u\】p a ca】nvas te【nt (】mayb/e next\ to your r】etr/o camper van) c】ould be /ae/sthetically mindblowing and highly practical/. F】at Lama is a platfo】【rm th/at allows \you\ to rent o】ther p\e/\ople’s cool t\ents that otherwise m\i【ght be 】a larg【e fina】【nci\al investment. \A bell tentBe pr/epared for】 th【e outdoor pi【cnic/sTake your own ba/mboo plates\ and cutlery for those /picnics underneath the shade of a willow tree next 】to a trickling stre\am. That/’s a/ ni\ce Romantic \nove【l【 image isn’t it? But /a bin filled with throwaway plastic forks and plates is not so\ much//. View this post o/n InstagramFrom /o/ur friends in N】o/rway/ @beeco】shop.no【 - Our new Grubware Eat/Drink Tool Kit in Norw\egi\an NYHET! Zero-waste best/ikksettet for den ak【tive ?? Dekker b//ehovene når du vil spise take-away【 i hverdagen, på fest/festival eller drikke juic/e eller smoothie. De【\tte kittet inneho】lde【r 【Spo【rk, gaffe【l/, skje, /kni】v, spi【se【pinn】er,/ sugerør og rengjørings/børste til】 sugerør. Lag/et //【av &os】lash;ko【logisk bambus og op/pbevart i】 en tøypose av &oslas【h;kologisk b】omull ? Mindre \avfal【l i hver【】】dagen】.【 Ja takk ?A post【 /shared b【【y bam【【bu® (\@b/ambuliving) on M【ay 15, 2019 at 2:34pm【 PDTTak\e food aw/ay wi】th youTaking 【food a\【way is a great way to /【prepare for your p/otentially isolated trip to/ the countrysid\e. So why no\t wr】ap /your food 【in\ c【ling film? Well, a\ccord】ing \to BeeBee 【‘more \than 1.2 bil】lion metres, equating \to 745,000 mi【les\ of【 cling fi【lm is used by ho】useho】lds a】cross Britain ev】ery year\&【rsquo;. Be】eswax wrap/s are a【 muc】h more su\stainable alt】\ernative to prolonging the life o【//f 【your foo】d. V/iew this post on Instagr/am\Happ\y /】Spring Equi【nox! ?? Al fresco eat【ing is 【wi】thin reac】h again! Hurray! . . . . . /#InternationalHappinessDay! #springequinox #spri】ng #beeswaxwraps #b\eebeewraps 【#food #alfresco/ #picnic \#outside 【#eating #alfre\scodining #flowers #tulips #plasticfree #zerowa】ste\ #foods【torage #packaging #clingfilmal\ternati】ve #ta\bl【e/ #b【ees #beeswax #organic #c】otton #organiccottonA post sh】ared【 by】 Bee【\Be【e Wraps/ (@beebe】】e】/wraps) 【o/n】 Mar 20\, 2019 at\ 10:30a\m P/DTShare this 】【article 】 More from pla\cesV2rK

X6gLText sizeAaAaJames Bo/nd actor】 J\avier Bardem has tak\】e/n to t【he streets of New York’s Tim】es Square【 to demand gre【】ate】r protection fo\r】 the worl【d’s oceans 【】ahead【【 of a mee/ting with th】e U/nite】d Nat\ions.The Oscar winner gave an 【imp/assioned spee】ch,\ \call/ing on deleg】ates at the U【N/ Convention on the Law \】of the Sea to agr\ee ta\rgets and give the green【 light to a Gl/obal Oce【ans Treaty./ Su\【ch an agreement /would increase the 】amount of international\ waters\ granted environmen/tal protection from 1% to 30% 】by【 2030.Bardem/ became an activ】ist with Gre/en【peace, focu【sin/g on】 p/rotection/ for An】tarctica at the//【 beginnin\g of\ last year.“The \ocean and its /inhabitants know no bou/ndaries. What ha】ppens in the /hig/h s/eas【, do/\e/sn&rsquo【;t stay /there. Whales, 【\turtles and fish don&rsquo/;t know our bo【r/ders/,&rdqu【o; Bard】em told【 the ass】em】bled media in Time\s 】Square.“They are a【ll co\nnected, and we 】are 】conne/ct\ed \to them.\ Our oce\ans are on the ve\rge of【 collapse and we】 have/\ all p/layed \a huge role in this. Now we mus/t all play\ our part to stop it by securing a st【ron】g Glob【al Ocean【 T【rea】ty.”Bard\em also 】pose/d for pi】ctur\【es alongside a ne】arly 6-metr/e tall【 sculptu\re of w】hales and turtles erec/】ted by Gr/ee】npeac【e outs【i【de N【ew York&【r【squo;s UN【 building. The artwork \rep\resented man】y of the threa】ts【 t/o】 mar】ine】 life from p/l/a\stic pollution to oil drilling, said the env/ironment charity.Threat of【 extinctio】nThi】s f\res【h pus】h【 for【 a Global Oceans Treaty】 comes after the Global Biodiversity Assess】ment Report found more tha\【n /a t/h\ir/d of marine mammals an\d shark speci【es are currently facing t\he threat o【f exti\nction. 】Gr【eenpea/ce has been\ campaigning/【 for th【e policy for more a decade, counting celebrities including Big Little \Lies\ star Shailene Woodley as】【 support\ers\.“Our o【ceans are in cr】isis and existing 【frame\work【s 】for safegu】【arding t【hem are inadequat【e. /Only 1% \of in【ter【national waters, which co】ver almost half the planet, are effecti】vely/ prote【ct/ed,” sa/id Will M\cCallum, Greenpeace o】ceans cam/pa【ign】er.The sculpture installed by Greenpeace depicts tu/rtles】 a/nd whales/ trapped in ghost gear©\【; Stephanie】 Ke【ith / Gr】eenpeace&ldquo【;Restorin】g the【 health of our oceans i\s critical in pre\】serving ma\rine life, tackling the clima/te crisis, and sustaining the lives and li\vel\ihoods of millio【ns of】 people who depend on them. A str】on】g Global Oc\ean \Treaty w/ill pave【 the way for a /【net】work of s】anct\uaries tha\t will p【lace at least a third】 o】f the【 world&rsquo】】;s oceans off-limit【s to hum/an activities.”Dr Essam Yassin Mohammed of t】he\ In/ternation\al Institute for Env\i】ronme】nt and Development said i/t was【 &l\dquo;/surprising&r】dquo; no such /laws were alread【y in effect, su\g】gesti【ng the/ 】n\【ew treaty s/hould pre\vent unsustainable fishing and ensure pari【ty 【of access for developing countries.&ld/quo;Th【e equi】table distributi】o】n of /conse】rvat\ion benefi【ts of /the high seas shou/ld \also be【 at 【the core of the negotiatio/ns. Any ne】w global agreement must ensure that /】de】sign/ated protec】ted ar【e【as consi\de】r h\ow to sup【port coastal communities ac\ross the developing world.”Share this a/rticle 【 More from lifeMUbn

FblhScientists in【 J\or/dan have discov【ered that corals \in the 【Gulf of Aqab【a are\ resisting the rise \in】 water tempe/ratures.Across the\ w/orld/, coral reefs are【 dying at rapid rates due\ to overfis\hing, pol【lution an/d climate ch】ange.It&rsq/uo;s est/i/mated that\ half the of earth\’s r【/eefs have been lost.This figure is thought to be critical, considering that corals are the habita\t of /one in fou【r 【of all marine species.【/Furthermore, up to half of the w/orld&rs【q【u/o;s oxygen co【mes】 fro【m t【\he oceans and the cor\a【l r\eefs wi/【thin.The exact/ reason /for the corals’ resilience in Jordan is s【till unknown, but some analys\t/s b【eli【eve tha\t t/he creatures【 evolved d/ur\ing/ the \last ice age of more tha【n 20,000 years ago.Samp/le/s of c/or/als in Jor/dan used for【 analy/sis】Doctor Fuad Al【\-Horani, professor of coral 【bi】ology and ecology at the //University of\ Jordan, ho\pes that the marine】 inverteb】ra】tes【 【may one-day be the ke】\y to re-pop/ulating th】e world’s\ dyi】ng reefs.“There are tech【niques -/ we can propagate corals," he says. "We can climatise them to c/on/ditions available to them in t【he other 】seas. So, o/nce we grow 】them, w】e can send them abroad where/ they【 ca【n grow them into 】dete【riorated areas or damaged 】r】eef areas./&rd】quo】;Doctor Al Hor/ani wor/ki/ng on c【orals in JordanTOURISM & EC【ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT\ STIL/L J\EOPARDISE AQABA RE【\EFSSpanni】ng【 a distance of 2】7 kilom】etres,/ the s/l/ither】 o\f coastland】 calle】d Aqab/a【 is/ Jordan&/rsq\uo;s only sea-outlet.Despite glimm\ers of hope, the port【\ city&/rsq\uo;s coral remains\ in dange/r, wit】h glo【bal dev【elopment and pollution threatening its surv】ival.Jordan&r】squo;s【 coastland and 】only portTo enc\ourage【 economic】 d【ev/e【lop】ment, whi/lst p\rotecting the re\【efs, i/s therefore a con/【stant c/】hallenge f/or the Jordanian authorities.】Aqaba\ is a major tourism hub which we【lcomed around 100,000 v\isito\rs last year. D/ue to t/he sector&rsqu【o;s expansion, Jordan&rsquo】;/s only 【port 【w】as/ re【locat/ed to】 the si/te 【of one of Aqa/ba&r/squo】】;s lar【gest reefs in 2006/.The governmen【t, w/ith \th/e help of the United Natio/ns, worked to save a portion of t【he t/housand-year-old 【【reef【 by r】/elocatin【g\ t【he coral two miles f】】urther \【alo/ng the coastline】.Co【ral r/eefs in Jo\rdan being r/\eloc/【\atedAccord/ing to Neda/l Al Ouran, He/ad of】 \th/e Environment【, Climat\e Change and Disaster Risk Reduc\tion of th】e United Nations Development/ Programme, /the/ replantation far】ed mu/ch better than \expec【】ted.&】ldquo;We had great】 success,” he says. &ldquo【;Lucki】ly, we got】 a grow】th【 ra/te\ of more \t【han 85 per cen\t,】 w】hich is unique.\ Globally, you would fin\d 【the average growth rat\e af【】ter tra/nspl】antation and translocation would 】be 65\】.”Eco-dive\rs in the region l】ike Abdullah Al Momany, howe/ver【, believe that much more still/ n】】eeds to be done.He is fearful that the relentless rate o】f progress and de】velopme】nt is thre【at【ening to compro】mise the re】al draw of the area/, the re/efs.&ldqu】o/;Here in Aqaba, our \big/gest pr\oblem is us affec/ting【 the marine【 environment as humans,&rd\quo; he says. &ldquo\;I think the government need/s to enforce the law, do more awar【enes\s program【m】【es, and/ do m/ore effort/ in /protect】ing the marine life.&rdqu/o;Share this arti】cleCopy/paste th】e ar/tic【l【】】e video embed lin】k【\ below:CopyShareTweetS【haresendSh/ar【eTwee/tSharesendM【oreHid\eSh/areSendShareSh【\ar【eShareSendShareShareYou m\i/ght【/ also lik】e \ \ 【 /Rain, flood【s and confused se\als: Inside/ An】\tarcti】ca's warmest-ever summ/e】r 】 \ / \ 】 / C】limate migrants: How even\ rich Bavaria ca/nnot provide sh】elter from glo/bal warm】in\g 】 【【 / 】 【 】 Living i【n \a ghos\【t town: Mee/t the Moldovans w/ho refus\e t】o b】e climate m【igra【nts 】 【 M\ore abou】tGlobal warmi/ng and /climate changeEnvironmental pr/otectionEcologySeaJordanHot TopicLearn more about \ Global 【warmin【g an\d climate change Hot TopicLear\n/ mo】r】】e about Global warming and clima【】te change / Browse today's【 tagsOfNg

1.WoC5Nigerian women revolutionising Fine Art 【2s9u

2.m9IhHow to make your start-up busi/ness sus\tainable from day onecaSZ

3.6ZLsSoybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020TM59

4.OHHCWhen it【 comes to cleaning 【up 】the \Oceans, tec【hn/ology may be good b\ut education is even betterN4IJ

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WSDbThe world economy will suffer 】its\ wors/t year 【since】 the Great Depression of the 】1930s, The Inte/r【nati】onal \Mon】etary F\und 】has said i\n i/ts l】atest forecast.The IMF said on【 Tuesd】a【y that it e/xpec\ts the g\lobal economy to s【hrin】k 】b【y 3 percent this year. Thi】s is far w\orse than the dip of 0.1 p】er】cent in the rec/essi/on year of 】2009 after\ the \financial crash.The glo\bal economy i【s t\hen expected【 t/o rebound with a 5.8 per\c】\ent grow/th in 2021, but that outlook is【 un【certain.&l【dquo;This is an unprec/edented sh\ock. We have shutdowns of important se】ct\ors o】f th【e\ econ\omy. 】As you re/-open sectors, you start from a very lo\w base, bu\t ec【onomi\c activity【 gradually come/】s bac】k,” Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, de】puty dir【【ector of/ the IMF's research de\partment, told/ Eur/onews.The bl\eak assessment represents 【a breatht\aking downgrade by the IMF. 【In January, before the【 C\OVID-19 】outbreak /emerged as \suc【\h a grave gl\obal threat, the internat】ional lending organi/s【ation fore】cast modest growth of 3.3】 /p【【【ercent this year.Howev【er, far-re【aching measures to co【ntain the pandemic -- lockdown】s, tr\avel restriction\s】\, \busines】s shutdow】ns /and social dist\ancing -【- h【ave suddenly br】ought 】economi\c activity to a near】-standst/ill."Becau】se the economic fallout is acute in specifi/c sectors, po【licymakers will need to impl【ement substantial ta/rg【\et【ed/ fiscal, m\onetary, and f\】in【an】cial ma】rket me【as【ure【s to support affected ho【useholds and businesses domestically,"【 the IMF say】s.The IM\F say/s Europe -- the epicentre of the/ pandemic -- has been pa【rt【icularly \badly hit. Eco】nom【ic c/ontractions of\ 7.5 percent ar】e e\xpected in 【t\h【e eur\o zone's 19 countries, and 6.5 percent /in t\he United Kingdom.】&ldqu【o;\The reason for the very, very sharp downgrade c】om\pared to other 】countries is simply that the epidemi】\c h】as taken \a much larger tol/l】 so fa】r on Europe than/ it has on】 other parts of the world,&rdquo/; Milesi-Ferretti said in a\n inter\v/i【ew with\/ E\【urone【ws'】 busine\ss editor】 Sasha Vakul】ina.&ld/qu/o;T】his is why【 it is so ess】ential for governmen/ts t】o take/ really dracon】ian】 measures to keep firms from going bankrupt, to k/ee】】p workers from losing their wages\. This\ is/ also a very l【ar\g】e investment that yo【u are makin【g /int【o preparing/ t/he ec/onomy to res】】tart," h\e /said.】World trade i\s pr】ed\icted to\ plunge 【by 11 per【cent t【his【 year b【efore growing by\ 】8.4 【p/ercent in\ 2021.【The IM【F ac\compa【nies its foreca\sts\ with a warni\ng that there are many unknown factors: inc\luding t】he pa\t/h the virus will】 ta\k\e, the effectivenes/s of \policies take】n t/o cont】ain the outbr\eak an\】d l【imi【t the economic damage, and uncertainty over the situation severa/l /months fro【m now.Share\ this article【C【opy/paste the【 article video embed【 link below/:CopyShareTweetS】hares】endShareTweetShare\】se】ndMore/HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also like\ 【 \ Coron】】avir】us in E【urope: How will the EU/ €5】00bn 【rescue deal help pe【ople and bu\sinesses? / / 【 \ / Coro\navir\us va】ccine: P\【h】arma giant】s\ G/S/K/ and S/anofi team up to【 find COVID-19 solution 【 【 Sur/vivors o】f cor】onavirus on their experience/ - and【 thei/r【 new perspective 【 / / 】 More aboutCorona\vir】usIMFFin\a【\n【cial /ai/dEcono】myHot 】Top\ic/Learn more about Coronav【irus Hot \To\picLearn more about/ Coronavirus / Browse today's/ tagsxZOy

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h41uAn international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gssCWm

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OSwpTe】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from places1sAN

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o8nu\President Donald Trump】 says he has issued a directive to halt U【S pay\ments 【to t\he\ World Health \【O【rganizatio\/n.T】/he funding wi【ll】\ 【cease pending a review of WH/O's \warnings abo\ut/ the coronavirus\ and C/h/i】na.Trump sa/y【s 】the outb】reak could h\av/\e been contained at its sou【r【ce and spared lives had the U\N health a】gency done a better 【job inv/estigatin【g reports comin\g out【 of China.Trump cl【aims th/e organisation failed \to carry】 out its ///&ldquo\/;bas【ic dut/y&r【dquo; and】 must 【be held accountable.Shrinki【n】g of UK economyEarlier o【n【 Tuesday th/e UK's /tax and spending watchdog/ has s/aid the British econ【o\my \cou【ld shrink\ by 】a record 35 percent】 by June. The bl】eak report come【s fro【m the\ Office for Budget Respo】nsibil/ity.Com/menting【 on the g【\overnment's resp\onse /to the crisis, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak sa\id the measures p】u【t/ i\n p\lace w/ere the \"right p/lan".View his news conference in the video p/l/【ayer aboveOffi】ci【al statistics on Tuesday showed t\/hat hun【dred】s of deaths in British car【e homes have not been in】cluded i【n】 govern【【ment f】igures -- which only /take\ account of death/s in hospita\ls. I】【t【 has led to crit/ic/ism that the eld/erly ar\【e being "airb\rushe】d \/ou】t".Sunak insist【ed that the country's【 battle against coronavi/rus was "n\ot a\ choice between health 【and economics". Other 【key \developments:The/ Internationa/l Mone】tary Fund (IMF) sai】d in its】 latest forecast t/hat the w【orld econo\my would suffer its worst year since the Grea\t Depression of the 1930s \-- and shrink by thre/e percent in/ 20/20.US Presiden】t Donald 【Trump has defende/d his administra/tion's handling 【of the【 pan【demic】, saying he has "to】ta【l power" t\o li】ft the lockdown\ if need be.France\ /and India hav\e jo/ined Italy in/ extending their nationwide lockdowns to stem the spread of the deadly 【nove\l coronav【irus】.These decisi【ons come as the/ number of infec\tions【 worldwide near the two mi/llion threshold. Nearly 120,000 people have【 now lost 【/th\eir lives 】to COVI/D-1/9】.】Foll\o】w all the latest updatesShare thi/s articleCopy/paste the a\rticle【 vid】eo embed \lin/k below:Copy】ShareTweetS】h【aresendShareTweetS/ha【res【endMo/reHi\de\ShareSendShareShareShareSe【ndShar/eSh\a/reYou might also like / / / Rising populism sto【kes disco\ntent but offers f\ew solutions to】 global thre【ats like COV\ID-1【9 ǀ View 】 【 【 / \ C/ould a ce】ntury-old met/hod 】help treat COVID-】【1 pa】tients? 【 】 \ \ \ \ 】 / How to s】tay healthy\ working from h】【ome, according to chiropractor\s\ 】 【 More aboutC】O】VID【-1CoronavirusEuro【pean Un\ionHot Topi】cLea/rn more about / Coronavir\u\s Hot TopicLearn more about 【 Coronavirus \ Brow/se【 tod】ay】9;s tagsrywS

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utisText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000Family-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net wider twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife6u9w

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